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1 edition of Soviet legal philosophy found in the catalog.

Soviet legal philosophy

Soviet legal philosophy

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Published by Harvard Univ. Pr. 1951. in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby V.I. Lenin and others ; translated by Hugh W. Babb ; introduction by John W. Hazard.
SeriesTwentieth Century legal philosophy Seriel -- Vol.5
ContributionsLenin, V. I. 1870-1924., Babb, Hugh Webster.
The Physical Object
Pagination465p.
Number of Pages465
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14365028M

Books set in the Former Soviet Union shortages and Siberian labour camps and read about the human side of the Soviet experience? These books show us the real story about love, work, holidays, food, childhood, family relationships, and countless other human experiences under communism. Incorrect Book The list contains an incorrect book. Soviet Marxism-Leninism and its philosophy of dialectical materialism occupy a special, controversial, place in the history and theory of Mandan and Marxist thought. Officially, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union has seen itself as standing in true apostolic succession to Marx and : Eugene Kamenka.

contemporary Soviet law. Other entries indirectly indicate the effect of different historical patterns of development in the various areas of the Soviet Union, e.g. "Bigamy." Legal history within the Soviet period, i.e. the changes over the years in the Soviet point of view, is also carefully described. Central Asia was the sole Muslim region of the former Russian Empire that lacked a centralized Islamic organization, or muftiate. When Soviet leader Joseph Stalin created such a body for the region as part of his religious reforms during World War II, he acknowledged that the Muslim faith could enjoy some legal protection under Communist rule.

Studies in East European Thought (SEET) provides a forum for impartial scholarly discussion of philosophical thought and intellectual history of East and Central Europe, Russia, as well as post-Soviet states. SEET offers a venue for philosophical dialogue in a variety of relevant fields of study. Soviet Legal Innovations and the Law of the Western World John Quigley. This book explains an interaction between Soviet Russia and the West that has been overlooked in much of the analysis of the demise of the USSR. Legislation strikingly similar to the Marxist-inspired laws of Soviet Russia found its way into the legal systems of the Western.


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Soviet legal philosophy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Soviet legal philosophy. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book.

The state / V.I. Lenin --The revolutionary part played by law and the state; a general doctrine of law / P.I. Stuchka --The theory of Petrazhitskii: Marxism and social ideology ; Law, our law, foreign law, general law / M.A.

Reisner --The general theory of law and Marxism / E.B. Pashukanis --The right deviation in the Communist Party of. This book deals with Soviet conceptions of Law.

As is natural in a country where Law is regarded as an expression of social conditions and social needs, those conceptions are sociological rather than legal, i.e. they deal with Law not as an isolated system of values and norms but as an agent in social life. Rudolf Schlesinger; Soviet Legal Philosophy, The American Journal of Comparative Law, Volume 1, Issue1 FebruaryPages –, : Rudolf Schlesinger.

Soviet philosophy has no great reputation in the Western philosophical world. Physicists, mathematicians, geographers and geomorphologists, medical scientists and men working in certain branches of history and linguistics have found it profitable to follow the researches of their Soviet counterparts; philosophers have by: 5.

The legal relation: legal theory after legal positivism / Alexander Somek. K S Soviet legal philosophy / by V.

Lenin [and others] ; Translated by Hugh W. Badd ; with an introd. by John N. Hazard ; Cambridge: Harvard University Press, Skip to main content. MENU. Search Browse; Resources. Authors; Librarians; Editors; SocietiesCited by: 1.

Philosophy in the Soviet Union was officially confined to Marxist–Leninist thinking, Soviet legal philosophy book theoretically was the basis of objective and ultimate philosophical truth. During the s and s, other tendencies of Russian thought were repressed (many philosophers emigrated, others were expelled).

The Remnick book, Lenin’s Tomb, is more mainstream. Yes – that’s why it’s on my list. While Soviet Workers is one of those books that probably needs to be recommended by someone in the field, Remnick’s book is a paperback you might otherwise pick up at an airport for a holiday read.

COUPON: Rent Soviet Legal Philosophy 1st edition () and save up to 80% on textbook rentals and 90% on used textbooks. Get FREE 7-day instant eTextbook access. THE IMPASSE OF SOVIET LEGAL PHILOSOPHY Edgar Badenheimer* I. INTRODUCTION Inthe Harvard University Press published a volume entitled "Soviet Legal Philosophy" as part of its 20th Century Legal Philosophy Series.' The volume is designed to trace the development of Soviet legal.

The Law of the Soviet Union was the law as it developed in the Soviet Union (USSR) following the October Revolution of Modified versions of the Soviet legal system operated in many Communist states following the Second World War—including Mongolia, the People's Republic of China, the Warsaw Pact countries of eastern Europe, Cuba and Vietnam.

Soviet philosophy can no longer be ignored by any serious student of contemporary thought. It is the work of academic philosophers who, on the whole, are neither more nor less competent than their colleagues in the free world.

They have, however, inherited a reputation for the dogmatic repetip. on of superannuated doctrines. The Soviet state and the revolution in law, by E.B.

PashukanisSocialism and law, by P. YudinThe fundamental tasks of the science of Soviet socialist law, by A.Y. VyshinskyReport to the XVIII Party Congress, by J.V.

StalinThe theory of the state and law, by S.A. Golunskii and M.S. StrogovichThe Soviet state in the war for the Author: Hugh Webster Babb. current offering, Soviet Legal Philosophy, should more than recompense the professional and lay reader for the previous disappointment.

This volume is composed of seven major selections from leading Soviet jurists, representa-tive of each stage of Soviet development from the Revolution to the : Robert S.

Warshaw. BOOK REVIEWS HAZARD, JOHN N. (ed.). Soviet Legal Philosophy. Cambridge, Harvard Univer-sity Press, xxvii, pp. $ The 20th Century Legal Philosophy Series, the fifth volume of which is Soviet.

“Other feelings too can be philosophical—pain, grief, tedium, delight, exultation—if they are experienced on behalf of humankind. “I looked around me, and my soul became wounded by the suffering of mankind” is the opening of Alexander Radishchev’s “Journey from St.

Petersburg to Moscow” (), which laid the foundation of all subsequent Russian philosophy. PRINCIPLES OF SOVIET CRIMINAL LAW'' HAROLD J. BERPLANt I SOVIET criminal law reflects the reconciliation which Soviet Russia has effected in the last ten years between Revolutionary social-eco-nomic values and orthodox legal by: 6.

Through study of the Soviet Academy I had gained a better understanding of the political and institutional framework of science in the Soviet Union. During a year as an exchange graduate student at Moscow University in I frequently discussed dialectical materialism with Soviet.

Spanning from tothe book views the Soviet Union through six paradoxes. Stephen Lovell argues that these “paradoxes are not impediments to a true understanding of the Soviet Union; to recognize them, as this book will attempt to show, is a first step towards that understanding”(14)/5(29). The book was the first literary work to deal with the Soviet authorities' abuse of psychiatry.

[] Inthe Russian poet Joseph Brodsky wrote Gorbunov and Gorchakov, a forty-page long poem in thirteen cantos consisting of lengthy conversations between two patients in a Soviet psychiatric prison as well as between each of them separately.The Harvard collections Soviet Legal Philosophy, includes only one article by him: “The Revolutionary Part Played By Law And The State – A General Doctrine Of Law”, published inafter the introduction of the New Economic Policy.

It looks from this as if Stuchka prepared the ground for Pashukanis’s blinding insight of Soviet philosophy but examine the trends they display and the con-text in which they appear.

From this point of view, the gloomy picture of Soviet philosophy presented in the preceding pages is at least somewhat misleading. The Soviet Union is an ideological state. Marxism-Leninism has been proclaimed as the guiding philosophy permeating all Soviet.